Standing Rock Solidarity Network Resource Packet

Standing Rock Solidarity Network Resource Packet

While compiling notes for the creation of a Department of Bioregion Indigenous Solidarity Guide - we noticed that one of the primary tools - the Standing Rock Solidarity Resource Packet - is now offline, and that the mirror sites for most of it is now also offline. In an effort to preserve the lessons and wisdom learned from the Standing Rock Protests, we wanted to share our PDF’s for historical sake, but also in case they might be useful for future historians, students, activists and organizers.

Learning Coast Salish protocols, making acknowledgements meaningful, as defined by them:

Learning Coast Salish protocols, making acknowledgements meaningful, as defined by them:

Interested in genuine reconciliation and want to make “territorial acknowledgements” matter? Learn about Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh protocol practices and how settlers can integrate reconciliation into their own or their organisation's regular work.

Canadian Forces Illegally Enter Wet'suwet'en Country in Northern Cascadia

Canadian Forces Illegally Enter Wet'suwet'en Country in Northern Cascadia

On January 7, 2019, at approximately 2:51pm, RCMP and military forcefully breached a peaceful checkpoint on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory. Indigenous people were ripped from their homes by militarized police. There were at least 12 confirmed arrests, including an elder, and Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs were blocked from their own territories.

The Cascading Cascades of Cascadia - where does the name Cascadia come from?

The Cascading Cascades of Cascadia - where does the name Cascadia come from?

Cascadia — the evocative name of a region, an idea, a movement — wild and free, defined by the waters flowing from the continental crest through the headwaters of the Pacific. Cascadia is a bioregion, the place we call home, an identity, movement and positive vision for the future. But where did this name actually come from?

Cascadia Subduction Zone Tremors: 36,377 in 2018

Cascadia Subduction Zone Tremors: 36,377 in 2018

In 2018, the Cascadia Subduction Zone saw 36,377 Episodic Thrusts & Slips (ETS). These tremors are different from earthquakes, which are generally more sudden, and that of other, shallower faults, which can be generated from the pressure buildup of magma sitting under Cascadia’s many volcanoes along the Pacific Ring of Fire.

The Practice of Bioregionalism: An Interview with Richard Evenoff

The Practice of Bioregionalism: An Interview with Richard Evenoff

The Department of Bioregion is proud to share an interview between Evan O’Neil and Richard Evanoff, a professor of envrionmental ethics at Aoyama Gakuin University in Japan, who recently wrote the book Bioregionalism and Global Ethics as part of our archive of bioregionalism articles and resources. The interview originally appeared on Carnegie Council on August 3rd 2012.

Cascadia's Human Terrain: Shifting our perspective through Bioregional Mapping

Cascadia's Human Terrain: Shifting our perspective through Bioregional Mapping

A new interactive map of conveys the population change and density of the Cascadia bioregion over the past 20 years in 3d, as a new layer of human terrain.

Department of Bioregion responds to United States Federal Government Shutdown

Department of Bioregion responds to United States Federal Government Shutdown

Travel Advisory Alert: Please be alerted that on December 22nd, the Southern and very Northern regions of Cascadia have been impacted by a partial collapse of the United States Federal Government, which is unable to pay federal workers and employees.