Bioregionalism

Organizing Bioregionally: By Daniel Christian Wahl

Organizing Bioregionally: By Daniel Christian Wahl

The Department of Bioregion is excited to share this essay on organizing bioregionally from Daniel Christian Wahl, author of Designing Regenerative Cultures and teacher of the online course Design for Sustainability.

First Dept of Bioregion Flag Making Workshop hosted in Laurentia

First Dept of Bioregion Flag Making Workshop hosted in Laurentia

The Cascadia Department of Bioregion is proud to announce the completion of our first bioregional flag design workshop held in New York City, in the Laurentia Bioregion of North America. It included with attendees from three different North American bioregions and focused on how bioregional flags differ from national flags, and the importance of symbols that represent place.

The Cascading Cascades of Cascadia - where does the name Cascadia come from?

The Cascading Cascades of Cascadia - where does the name Cascadia come from?

Cascadia — the evocative name of a region, an idea, a movement — wild and free, defined by the waters flowing from the continental crest through the headwaters of the Pacific. Cascadia is a bioregion, the place we call home, an identity, movement and positive vision for the future. But where did this name actually come from?

The Practice of Bioregionalism: An Interview with Richard Evenoff

The Practice of Bioregionalism: An Interview with Richard Evenoff

The Department of Bioregion is proud to share an interview between Evan O’Neil and Richard Evanoff, a professor of envrionmental ethics at Aoyama Gakuin University in Japan, who recently wrote the book Bioregionalism and Global Ethics as part of our archive of bioregionalism articles and resources. The interview originally appeared on Carnegie Council on August 3rd 2012.

Cascadia's Human Terrain: Shifting our perspective through Bioregional Mapping

Cascadia's Human Terrain: Shifting our perspective through Bioregional Mapping

A new interactive map of conveys the population change and density of the Cascadia bioregion over the past 20 years in 3d, as a new layer of human terrain.

Why the Cascadia Movement Matters Now More Than Ever

Why the Cascadia Movement Matters Now More Than Ever

The Cascadia Department of Bioregion is excited to share a new medium article about why bioregionalism, and movements like the Cascadia movement - are more important than ever, and valuable lessons for every organizer.