Essays

Demonstrating Cascadia Decolonization - Recognizing Indigenous History

Demonstrating Cascadia Decolonization - Recognizing Indigenous History

In this brief essay, contributor Trevor Owen outlines a decolonization strategy he learned while living in Australia. The practice of starting meetings down under with a “Welcome to Country” intro and sometimes presentation shifts the focus towards indigenous power and place.

The History of the Salish Sea: Bert Webber discusses the Salish Sea in KNKX Feature

The History of the Salish Sea: Bert Webber discusses the Salish Sea in KNKX Feature

The Cascadia Department of Bioregion is excited to share this wonderful article, audio feature and Salish Sea series created by local Seattle radio station KNKX. The Salish Sea is a defining example of bioregionalism in action, and more people need to know the power of it’s creation, and of place making.

The Cascading Cascades of Cascadia - where does the name Cascadia come from?

The Cascading Cascades of Cascadia - where does the name Cascadia come from?

Cascadia — the evocative name of a region, an idea, a movement — wild and free, defined by the waters flowing from the continental crest through the headwaters of the Pacific. Cascadia is a bioregion, the place we call home, an identity, movement and positive vision for the future. But where did this name actually come from?

Cascadia's Human Terrain: Shifting our perspective through Bioregional Mapping

Cascadia's Human Terrain: Shifting our perspective through Bioregional Mapping

A new interactive map of conveys the population change and density of the Cascadia bioregion over the past 20 years in 3d, as a new layer of human terrain.

Why the Cascadia Movement Matters Now More Than Ever

Why the Cascadia Movement Matters Now More Than Ever

The Cascadia Department of Bioregion is excited to share a new medium article about why bioregionalism, and movements like the Cascadia movement - are more important than ever, and valuable lessons for every organizer.

How to create a leaderless revolution and win lasting political change | Carne Ross

How to create a leaderless revolution and win lasting political change | Carne Ross

The Department of Bioregion is excited to share the essay “How to Create a Leaderless Revolution and Win Lasting Change” by Carne Ross as part of Changelab series documenting theory, case studies and ideas that change the world.

This Place - by Cascadia Matters

This Place - by Cascadia Matters

This essay is from Casey, Devin & Mel from Cascadia Matters, released in 2012, and the creators of the Occupied Cascadia documentary. Cascadia Matters was a film and educational collective in Bend, Oregon dedicated to a radical and real decolonization of the Cascadia bioregion by those living here, and a true solidarity with First Nations and indigenous cultures and ways of living.